Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Surviving Attacks by Crazed Gunmen: The Politically Correct Guide


If faced with a crazed gunman:
(1) Immediately run to the nearest Gun Free Zone. This will stop the attack, since any armed attacker will be unable to follow you.

(2) If he does follow you, point forcefully to the sign designating the Gun Free Zone. This will remind the attacker that guns are not allowed, and that he will have to leave.

(3) If he does not leave, point again and ask whether he saw the sign. You may ask this question multiple times, in an increasingly insistent tone of voice. (Do not ask if he can read English, however, as this may be considered insensitive and racist.)

(4) In the unlikely event that this does not work, and it appears that the attacker still intends to kill you, you have the option of leaving the Gun Free Zone and proceeding to any nearby place where armed good guys are present.

(5) Survivors should make broad generalizations concerning "doing something" about gun violence. In doing so, you should avoid limiting your suggestions to dealing with armed criminals, since this is a coded assertion of privilege and may be deemed discriminatory.



JEFFREY CAMINSKY, a retired public prosecutor from Michigan, writes on a wide range of topics. His books include the Guardians of Peace-tm science fiction adventure series, The Sonnets of William Shakespeare, and the acclaimed Referee’s Survival Guide, a book on soccer officiating. All are published by New Alexandria Press, and are available on Amazon, as well as directly from the publisher.

Monday, November 3, 2014

Rights, Responsibilities, and the Constitution


The reason the Constitution speaks more of rights than responsibilities is that it was written to protect the individual from the Government.  That is why, as written, it specifies and limits the powers of the central government, and spells out many of the things that the Government is forbidden from doing.  While that has not always kept the Government on its leash, it gives us a point of reference to help those of us who are interested in such things discern what the Government should and should not be doing...and to let us see where we've gone off track.
 
The Founders presumed that most people, enjoying the freedom to make anything out of their life that they wished, would be responsible for themselves.  And part of the obligation of each generation was to teach the lessons of personal responsibility, shared obligations, and the importance of community and tradition, to each succeeding generation.
 
With the advent of the Welfare State, a growing number of Americans have become more interested in what they can get from the Government than with providing for themselves.  With personal responsibility now becoming seen by many as more of a lifestyle choice than a prerequisite for self-government, we can now see clearly where this will lead us in the not-too-distant future if we don't change course rather soon.   
"Freedom is a fragile thing and is never more than one generation away from extinction. It is not ours by inheritance; it must be fought for and defended constantly by each generation, for it comes only once to a people. Those who have known freedom and then lost it have never known it again.” 
~ Ronald Reagan, from his first inaugural speech as governor of California, January 5, 1967

JEFFREY CAMINSKY, a retired public prosecutor from Michigan, writes on a wide range of topics. His books include the Guardians of Peace-tm science fiction adventure series, The Sonnets of William Shakespeare, and the acclaimed Referee’s Survival Guide, a book on soccer officiating. All are published by New Alexandria Press, and are available on Amazon, as well as directly from the publisher.

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Happy Birthday, Dad...We Miss You

It's been nearly four months since my father died.  In the time since then, our family has undergone many changes --- some from simply mourning the loss of someone we loved, others from happier events, such as the wedding of my daughter.  Through it all, my writing has largely been put on a sabbatical.

Today would have been my father's 92nd birthday.  We visited his grave at the National Cemetery in Holly to wish him a happy birthday, and had a toast in his honor over lunch in Fenton.

This is the obituary I wrote for him.

Wallace Caminsky
October 28, 1922–July 6, 2014

Wallace Caminsky was born on October 28, 1922, the oldest child of immigrant parents. Growing up in Hamtramck, his family was hit hard during the Depression, and he grew up watching his parents scramble to make a living. Graduating from Hamtramck High in 1940, he briefly attended college, until the outbreak of World War II. Enlisting in the Army, he worked as a cryptographer on a command ship in the South Pacific, the USCGC Ingham, where he saw action in the Philippines and other islands.

On his return, he graduated from Wayne State University, majoring in English. In 1948 he married Alice Luniewski — also from Hamtramck — and soon began a family of his own. His first son, Jeff, was born in 1951, and a second son — Chris — followed three years later. Working in the auto industry, he moved from Ford Motors to Chrysler in 1957, where he worked for the next twelve years. Active in politics and current events throughout his life, he was deeply shaken by the Kennedy assassination, and was a member of various human rights groups during the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. He remained interested and involved in current affairs until his death.
 
Eager to expand his horizons, he started law school in 1964, attending night classes at the Detroit College of Law and graduating in 1969 — the same year his oldest son graduated from high school. After practicing law with the firm of Kazmarek and Nedzi, he became an administrative law judge in 1975, and served in that capacity until his retirement in 1987.
 
Interested in literature as well as sports and current events, he wrote poetry and short stories, and published two books: All Fathers Are Giants, a collection of short stories; and Words for Other People’s Music, a collection of his poems. 
 
He leaves behind a loving family, including his devoted wife, Alice, his two sons, Jeffrey and Christopher and their wives, Navona and Catherine, grandchildren Jason and Julia, and great-grandchildren Alana and Elise.
Wallace Caminsky died on July 6, 2014, after a long illness.


Happy birthday, Dad.  We love you, and will always miss you.


JEFFREY CAMINSKY, a retired public prosecutor from Michigan, writes on a wide range of topics. His books include the Guardians of Peace-tm science fiction adventure series, The Sonnets of William Shakespeare, and the acclaimed Referee’s Survival Guide, a book on soccer officiating. All are published by New Alexandria Press, and are available on Amazon, as well as directly from the publisher. 
 

Friday, December 20, 2013

Shadows of Love

Love can inspire us to see beauty, and also to seek it in those around us...and, sometimes, in those who are gone. And if God is love, then perhaps we can understand where many of our most touching thoughts and ideas come from.
 
 
In 2009, a... man and the woman he loved took some wedding photos in the empty house they hoped to live in forever.  Two years later, as she lay dying from a rare form of cancer, her greatest fear was that her baby daughter would never remember her. And so, to reunite the two of them...and show their little girl what Mommy was like on the happiest day of her life. And so, as he was leaving a house once filled with so many dreams for the last time, a still-grieving father managed to give his wife a last present, and his daughter something to treasure for the rest of her life.

Mom's Memory Lives On...

Love endures...joyous, sometimes bittersweet...but always heartfelt.  And wherever it appears, the Universe smiles.

Source: Melanie Tracy Pace / Loft3 Photography

JEFFREY CAMINSKY, a retired public prosecutor from Michigan, writes on a wide range of topics. His books include the Guardians of Peace-tm science fiction adventure series, The Sonnets of William Shakespeare, and the acclaimed Referee’s Survival Guide, a book on soccer officiating. All are published by New Alexandria Press, and are available on Amazon, as well as directly from the publisher.

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Lessons Unlearned

"Progress, far from consisting in change, depends on retentiveness. When change is absolute there remains no being to improve and no direction is set for possible improvement: and when experience is not retained, as among savages, infancy is perpetual. Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it."
 
George Santayana, The Life of Reason
 
 
I think many of the political problems we seem to be having these days stems from our differing perspectives on human history and experience:
 
In the main, whether by dint of personality or education, conservatives tend to show more respect for tradition and institutions.  This stems from a reading of History that shows (a) most innovation leads to failure or disaster; (b) there are few things new under the sun; (c) most "innovations" have already been tried...and were discarded for a good reason; (d) there are some human values that we simply have to accept a priori, since applying sterile logic to the human condition leads to a sterile and withering nihilism that is not conducive to human growth; (e) as our capacity for unintended consequences appears to know no limits, we need to be very careful when making changes; (f) a page of history being worth a volume of logic, experience will be a better guide for us than abstract logic; and, therefore, (g) small, incremental changes are likely to lead to better results than grand plans based on the hope that we can remake the world to our liking.
 
It seems to me that modern-day liberals (as opposed to Classical Liberals, who would likely be described as "conservatives" in today's political climate) tend to scoff at tradition, and set their sights on remaking the world into something better.  This, in turn, leads to (a) a rejection of History as a guide to the future; (b) the belief that Man is infinitely malleable; (c) the belief that one can devise solutions to problems through the use of logic, rather than practical experimentation; and, as a consequence (d) the conviction that the "masses" must be led to the future, since they are incapable of knowing what's best for them; and (e) the conclusion that ultimate wisdom is to be found in educated elites, rather than History, Experience, or Tradition.
 
Personally, I think we're far better off muddling through as best we can and tinkering at the margins to make things better, than we are trying to devise "grand plans" to solve all our problems in one fell swoop.  Evidence for this abounds, even if we limit our search to the last Century:
 
Exhibit A:  Soviet Russia
Exhibit B: The War on Poverty
Exhibit C: Modern Feminism, and the entire PC movement
Exhibit D: Obamacare
 
It is all well and good to be a dreamer and idealist, and to devise grand notions for making the world a better place.  But as tradition notes, the road to Hell is paved with good intentions, and it's usually unwise to fix something that isn't broken.  The conceit that humans can foresee all the consequences of what they're doing leads us to farce and tragedy; and I suspect that our descendants will be looking back on our Age of Folly and shaking their heads...wondering how their ancestors could have been so stupid.
 
Of course, that may not prevent them from making their own stupid mistakes.  But it seems to me that one benefit of looking at the past is to see and learn from the mistakes of others --- including the conceit that "Our Era" has the answers to problems that have plagued Mankind since the beginning, and that human folly is limited to the past.
 
I hope one day, humanity can master this lesson; it's one that our generation seems never to have learned.


JEFFREY CAMINSKY, a retired public prosecutor from Michigan, writes on a wide range of topics. His books include the Guardians of Peace-tm science fiction adventure series, The Sonnets of William Shakespeare, and the acclaimed Referee’s Survival Guide, a book on soccer officiating. All are published by New Alexandria Press, and are available on Amazon, as well as directly from the publisher.

Friday, November 22, 2013

Fifty Years Ago

On the Friday before my twelfth birthday, I went to school looking forward to the weekend.  I'd hoped to get my first record player as a birthday present, and since next week was Thanksgiving, I had a shortened week of school ahead of me as well.

The day went ahead largely as planned, although I wasn't looking forward to a math test in Mrs. Albee's class at the end of the day.  But I sailed through my morning classes, and after gym class proceeded to my science class, still dreading my upcoming math test the next hour, but starting to get excited about the weekend ahead.

As we settled into our seats, a teacher from down the hall came to the door, and whispered something to Mrs. Jewell, the nice old lady who was our science teacher.  I caught a whiff of what he'd said --- "Kennedy's been shot" --- and a cold shiver ran down my spine.  Mrs. Jewell calmly relayed the news, and none of us paid much attention to the rest of class.

Next hour, Mrs. Albee told us that the President had died, and our principal made the announcement over the speaker.  I still had to take the math test, and then faced a long walk home; there, my mother was in tears:  Kennedy was a hero in our house; and those tears lasted for a long time.

President Kennedy embodied the hopes and dreams of an entire generation, and symbolized a country brimming with confidence and idealism, committed to freedom and liberty, and ready to make the world a better place.  Those dreams were shattered on the streets of Dallas that day --- November 22, 1963 --- and the country has never been the same.

In some ways, the country is a better place today.  In many ways, it is not:  in those days, the president rode in an open-topped car, to be closer to the people; the streets of Washington were lined with open monuments to democracy, rather than barricades against terrorists; we didn't need to be searched before boarding an airplane; and we were filled with hope and optimism about the future.

Time marches on; and fifty years later, America is not the same place.  Every year, the shadow of a small boy eagerly awaiting a birthday feels his heart being ripped out.  And the dreams that died with President Kennedy in Dallas continue to haunt us.

But after fifty years, the torch has been passed...and, sadly, it's time to move on. Memories fade, the human spirit heals, and life goes on.


JEFFREY CAMINSKY, a retired public prosecutor from Michigan, writes on a wide range of topics. His books include the Guardians of Peace-tm science fiction adventure series, The Sonnets of William Shakespeare, and the acclaimed Referee’s Survival Guide, a book on soccer officiating. All are published by New Alexandria Press, and are available on Amazon, as well as directly from the publisher.  
 

Thursday, May 30, 2013

Modern Fables: Tool Maintenance

One day, after a long day of shopping with her friend Joanne, Ethyl came home and was horrified to find her husband, Frank, in bed with a gorgeous younger woman.

After hurling objects of various size and breakability at him, she turned to storm out of the house and head off to Joanna’s house, when she was stopped at the door by her husband, clad in his oversized terrycloth bathrobe.

Turning angrily, Frank managed to deflect her fist and, holding her tightly to minimize the danger to himself, he insisted on explaining what he described as a big misunderstanding.

“It’s actually kind of funny, if your really think about it,” Frank said, keeping a tight hold on Ethyl’s fist. “But when I was driving home I saw this young girl --- looking all poor and tired --- so I offered her a ride. And as we drove, she told me she was hungry, so I brought her home and fed her some of the roast you had forgotten about in the refrigerator.

“Well, her shoes were worn out so I gave her a pair of your shoes you never wear because you don’t like them. You know, the red high heels I gave you for your Christmas last year --- the ones you insist make your legs look fat?

“Anyway, she was also cold, so I gave her that new birthday sweater you refused to wear because the color clashed with your eyes. And her slacks were worn out so I gave her a pair of yours that haven’t worn in five years. You know, the black ones that you keep saying are too tight.”

“That doesn’t explain what she was doing in bed with you!” Ethyl hollered.

“Well,” Frank said sheepishly, “as she was about to leave the house, she paused and asked, 'Is there anything else that your wife doesn't use anymore?

“And, so here we are….”

And of course, the moral of this story is:

Since tools can turn rusty from disuse, wise owners will clean and polish them regularly.

JEFFREY CAMINSKY, a retired public prosecutor from Michigan, writes on a wide range of topics. His books include the Guardians of Peace-tm science fiction adventure series, The Sonnets of William Shakespeare, and the acclaimed Referee’s Survival Guide, a book on soccer officiating. All are published by New Alexandria Press, and are available on Amazon, as well as directly from the publisher. His series on "Modern Fables" are adapted from a variety of sources...from Aesop to the Interet...and retold in what he intends to be an engaging and humorous manner.